Tokyo Declaration on Patient Safety

More than 200,000 people die every year in U.S. hospitals and 3 million worldwide in ways that could have been prevented.

 

Attendees from across 40 countries gathered in Tokyo, Japan for the Third Global Ministerial Summit on Patient Safety.

 

The Patient Safety Movement Foundation (PSMF) announced its support for the Tokyo Declaration on Patient Safety, which was put forward by Japan, Germany, and the United Kingdom at the Third Global Ministerial Summit on Patient Safety, held in Tokyo, Japan on 13-14 April 2018.

 

The Declaration asks countries to accelerate their progress toward improving patient safety globally by aligning incentives, increasing transparency and implementing practices that acknowledge the importance of continuous improvement when it comes to safety and quality in healthcare.

 

“This Declaration is a monumental step toward transparency, aligned incentives and global cooperation to improve patient safety and enhance our healthcare systems. By continually coming together, sharing progress, connecting the dots, and focusing on action, we are closer to attaining our goal of zero preventable deaths by 2020,” explained Patient Safety Movement Founder & Chairman Joe Kiani, who spoke at the Third Ministerial Summit in Tokyo.

 

Kiani thanked the world ministers in attendance for their leadership, and asked them to plan for zero preventable deaths by:

  • instituting transparency at each hospital,
  • incentivizing hospitals to implement processes proven to reduce preventable deaths and
  • encouraging medical companies to share their data to improve early diagnosis.

The Global Ministerial Summit founded by Rt. Hon. Jeremy Hunt MP and organised by Mr. Toshihiko Takeda, the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, Japan, brings together international experts, Ministers of Health and other high-ranking political decision-makers with the goal of generating and promoting a global movement to advance patient safety.

 

Attendees from across 40 countries included Japan’s Minister of Health, the United Kingdom’s Secretary of Health and Social Care, the World Health Organisation, Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), World Bank, Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA), and World Medical Association (WMA).

 

The Summit addressed topics which include: culture of safety, patient safety in an aging society, economics of patient safety, as well as achieving universal health coverage that also ensures patient safety systematically in all countries, including low- and middle-income countries.

 

The Patient Safety Movement Foundation was established through the support of the Masimo Foundation for Ethics, Innovation, and Competition in Healthcare to reduce that number of preventable deaths to 0 by 2020 (0X2020).

 

Improving patient safety will require a collaborative effort from all stakeholders, including patients, healthcare providers, medical technology companies, government, employers, and private payers.

 

Patient safety Movement website - https://patientsafetymovement.org/.

 

16 April 2018.