Australia still pumping out 1% of world CO2 emissions

In the shadow of the Paris Climate Talks Australia has still not reduced carbon dioxide emissions substantively and remains responsible for one per cent of world emissions.

 

Australia's Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull is presently in Paris France with world leaders working toward a global solution to an extremely complex global problem.

 

The International Energy Agency report, Global Tracking Framework estimates that, as of 2010, 17% of the global population did not have access to electricity while 41% still relied on wood or other biomass to cook and heat their homes.

 

The Union of Concerned Scientists has reported that the world's countries contribute different amounts of heat-trapping gases to the atmosphere.

 

The table below shows data compiled by the US Energy Information Agency (Department of Energy), which estimates carbon dioxide emissions from all sources of fossil fuel burning and consumption.  The Union list the 20 countries with the highest carbon dioxide emissions (data are for 2011, the most recent year available).

 

2011 Total Emissions Country Rank

Country

2011 Total Carbon Dioxide Emissions from the Consumption of Energy (Million Metric Tons)

1.

China

8715.31

2.

United States

5490.63

3.

Russia

1788.14

4.

India

1725.76

5.

Japan

1180.62

6.

Germany

748.49

7.

Iran

624.86

8.

South Korea

610.95

9.

Canada

552.56

10.

Saudi Arabia

513.53

11.

United Kingdom

496.80

12.

Brazil

475.41

13.

Mexico

462.29

14.

South Africa

461.57

15.

Indonesia

426.79

16.

Italy

400.94

17.

Australia

392.29

18.

France

374.33

19.

Spain

318.64

20.

Poland

307.91

 

The picture that emerges from these figures is one where—in general—developed countries and major emerging economy nations lead in total carbon dioxide emissions.

  World CO2 emissions

 Developed nations typically have high carbon dioxide emissions per capita, while some developing countries lead in the growth rate of carbon dioxide emissions.

 

Obviously, these uneven contributions to the climate problem are at the core of the challenges the world community faces in finding effective and equitable solutions the Union said.

 

1 December 2015.